Eric Oakley Disc Golf Clinic | Backhand Throw


(upbeat music) – Alright, so one thing
I like to talk about with the backhand drive, and it’s one thing that stays
the same for most plates, is in the pull back, you’re
extended all the way back. No curl, nothing, the arm
is reached all the way back and now from here, this point, you’ve maximized your potential energy by pushing your arm all the
way out as far as it can without being totally out of
control and not losing sight. Arm comes all the way back. Now the disc stays on one
plane across your chest. The disc never turns,
never does anything else. It comes from here, one
plane, driving through. So now the only thing that
changes is your angle of release, so if you’re looking to throw
flat, you stay pretty level. Disc comes flat, drive across
your chest flat, release flat. That’s what you’re trying to focus on. If you’re coming for a Hyzer,
pull your shoulders over, disc comes down, stays
on this level plane, but the disc is now on
a Hyzer line, right? On a Hyzer angle. Now, as you pull through,
your shoulders lean forward. Drive, keep that disc on a Hyzer. I’m not saying lean over too far. Just find that balance
of where you need to be to release your Hyzer,
’cause some of them, you need to stay tall to throw high. Different things like that. Now, the Anhyzer, it’s the opposite. Now you just lean back. As you come through,
disc stays on one plane. Shoulders stay back as you
drive through, allowing the disc to come and release
out on that Anhyzer angle. So little things, like I said, the disc comes all the
way back in one plane. One plane, did I say it enough? You guys will learn that. I have unorthodox form. If you guys have watched a video
or have ever seen me throw, it’s not the norm, but the
one thing that I do get to is like as I said, this one point here, I come through, I pull
the disc up and I’m here, but I’m in this motion here,
where the disc is here, and it pulls across my
chest where it needs to be. So getting there, getting to that point of where your arm is all
the way extended back can be different and it
varies from different players, so go with what feels
comfortable with you, but there are a lot of slow motion videos of a lot of the top pros and I suggest looking at those
guys, seeing what they do. Mine’s unorthodox and I
wouldn’t try and teach you how I exactly go through
my run-up and throw. I would want you to feel it out and make it look good for
you and feel good for you, and you do that in the field
and you do that on the course. The last thing about the backhand drive, and remember, keep those questions logged about grip, anything else. The last thing about the
backhand drive is the last step. I think this is one of
the most important things that gets missed a lot
in the backhand drive is you wanna come after you
come out of your X-step, plant slightly out in front. More often than not, players
come and they plant level. This is going to cause
you to lose rotation and it’s going to cause
you to pull your line, so where I’m at now if I were
to pull through straight back, feet are level, my line is to the right. So now, whenever I come, if I come through and I plant here out in front
and I’m pulling through now, my line drives me, with my
knee pointing after I spin, and I’m pointing where
I want the disc to go, hitting my line. So getting that last
step just out in front also helps you get full
extension in your reach back and drive through, getting
your weight transfer and working your core and
your legs into your throw. Now, everybody’s is gonna be different. This is one thing that
I have to try and teach as much as I possibly can. Everybody throws differently. Everybody should throw different discs because all of our bodies
are very different. So if I’m throwing a disc for a shot, it might not be the same for you. And the same thing is
if I’m coming through, I might over-exaggerate. I might have a bigger step out in front because that’s what I need. Somebody else might need
a half step out in front. So again, fieldwork helps a lot. (upbeat music)

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