In-flight ultrasound saved this VIP’s life


The next morning, after the operation, the
chief of surgery came in, and he said, “I’ve no idea why God has kept you on
this planet because you shouldn’t be; so, you’re here for a reason.
You don’t know what it is now, but you probably are here for a reason.” When I left here after the VIP
tour and got the total story, had it not been for what they did in flight,
there’s no way I’d be alive today. So I owe my life to them, and I’m just so
thankful that they’re here. On May 19, 2017, I went to our local hospital.
Getting into the hospital is pretty much the last thing I remember. From what I
understand, I dropped dead once I was there. They spent four and a half minutes on
CPR to get my heart started again and knew that there was a big problem, so
they called STARS. On the flight back, I think where the
real miracle happened is that Tara, who’s sitting here, and Rene were able to
perform an ultrasound. I got a really quick glance at an
abnormal ultrasound of his aorta. I got my partner to take video footage while I was actually ultrasounding. We transfered that information
on to our transport physician, who immediately told us that, yeah, there was something not quite right, and (so) we’ve
changed our hospital destination. From what I understand, that probably saved
between four to five hours of ground time. To me, there’s absolutely no doubt that I
wouldn’t have made it another four to five hours. Luckily he was stable enough to go to CT, and
then he immediately went to the operating room, where they were able to
repair his aorta. It was diagnosed as a abdominal aortic aneurysm, and I found out
later the mortality rate is 95 per cent. So the aorta is a large blood vessel that pumps high-pressure blood from your
heart out into the rest of your body, and it carries on through your chest and
down into your abdomen. Normally it should be about the size of your finger,
or less than 3 cm; and in Ron’s case, it was around 8 or 9 cm. Ultrasound is very essential for our environment. An ultrasound provides us
that window that we’re able to see what’s actually going on into this patient’s body. The ultrasound tool saved this
gentleman’s life, so that means the world to us because that wouldn’t have
been caught if we didn’t have that ultrasound machine. Every day is a blessing now.
Every day I’ve got is is a day I probably shouldn’t have, but I’m
very grateful for having it. Again… I just can’t thank these people enough.

One comment

  • My husband passed away at the age of 60 in 2014 due to a aortic aneurysm.This man was lucky as he had medical personal there w/him and it was just my husband and myself and little did I know when I was preforming CPR on him,he was already gone.Best of luck Mr.Diller as you was/are one of the lucky one's.God Bless you and yours and all of the medical guys and gals out there

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